2012 SEVEN TO SAVE ANNOUNCEMENTS

PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF CHARLESTON LAUNCHES 7 to SAVE PROGRAM
May 12, 2011

 “Seven to Save” is an annual outreach program of the Preservation Society of Charleston designed to focus the work of the organization in a proactive and constructive way, delivering intellectual and financial resources to raise awareness and support for key preservation projects in Charleston and the region.

Seven sites, representative of seven broader issues, will be announced each year during National Historic Preservation Month in May as “Seven to Save.”  Associated with each site will be specific programmatic activity, which can include:

  • protective ordinances
  • historic resource surveys
  • National Register nominations
  • preservation and stabilization plans
  • adaptive use plans
  • historic markers
  • community workshops and training
  • hands-on clean-up/fix-up efforts 
  • historical research
  • fundraising and special events
  • public awareness campaigns

“The scope and aim of the Society should be very far reaching, ramifying into all parts of the city and all branches of the work of preservation.”
- Minutes, Society for the Preservation of Old Dwellings, May 5, 1920

Seven to Save Fund 


Donation Amount
$

 

2011 Seven to Save Sites:

MAGNOLIA CEMETERY RECEIVING TOMB

Built circa 1850 and attributed to Edward C. Jones, the Magnolia Cemetery Receiving Tomb is in need of critical structural repairs and restoration.  Historic mausoleums are an important part of Charleston’s architectural heritage and many are suffering from demolition by neglect.

1-Structural/Preservation Plan
2-Stabilize/Restore
3-Survey of Historic Mausoleums

CIVIL RIGHTS ERA SITES

17 Henrietta Street, the home of civil rights leader Septima Clark, was demolished for a parking lot and is an example of a lost historic resource.  Sites in the region associated with the mid-20th century Civil Rights Era are endangered because of a lack of documentation and awareness of their significance.

1-Diversity Programs Intern to organize Charleston African American
Preservation Alliance
2-Oral History Interviews focusing on Civil Rights Era with Trident
Technical College/Palmer Campus
3-Create five historic markers

QUARTERS “A” CHARLESTON NAVY YARD

Quarters “A” was built in 1905 as the Commandant’s House; it has stood vacant since the closure of the Navy Base in 1996 and is in need of major stabilization work.  Several structures in the Charleston Navy Yard Officers’ Quarters Historic District are suffering from demolition by neglect.

1-Adaptive use plan for the structure
2-Assist with locating resources for stabilization/preservation

CHARLESTON SINGLE COTTAGES AT 193-199 JACKSON STREET

The cottages at 193-199 Jackson Street were built circa 1900 as four identical structures that are now vacant and in need of rehabilitation.  An important vernacular building type in Charleston, the “single cottage” form is being lost throughout the city be demolition and inappropriate alteration.

1-National Register of Historic Places nomination
2-Design competition for rehabilitation plans

ROSE LANE BELGIAN BLOCK PAVING

This modest lane in Elliottborough was paved with Belgian blocks circa 1915, but later covered with asphalt in the 1970’s.  Historic paving materials from the 19th and early 20th centuries represent a major civic investment that are not protected by local ordinance.

1-Survey of extant historic paving materials in the Old City District
2-Removal of asphalt/restoration of Rose Lane
3-Ordinance to protect historic paving materials

NEW TABERNACLE FOURTH BAPTIST CHURCH

Francis D. Lee’s circa 1860 Gothic Revival church at 22 Elizabeth Street, originally known as St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, requires extensive preservation work.  Many downtown historic churches are suffering from deferred maintenance as congregations dwindle in size and financial resources for repairs become scarce.

1-Survey needs of historic downtown churches
2-Host a workshop to discuss church preservation issues
3-Adaptive use plans for 22 Elizabeth Street

KING STREET OFF-RAMP HOUSES

The vacant houses at 68 & 74 Fishburne Street and 306 & 308 St. Philip Street were built circa 1920 in the Wilson’s Farm subdivision, an eligible historic district.  Historic structures along the 1960’s-era Septima Clark Parkway are suffering from demolition by neglect because of their proximity to a busy six-lane highway.

1-Spring Master Preservationist Program: Adaptive Use plans for structures
2-Survey of at-risk structures w/GIS/map
3-Development of incentives/tie to Demolition by Neglect Task Force

 

© 2014 Preservation Society of Charleston