Category Archives: Preservation

Get Engaged: PSC’s new website makes it easier than ever

 

A letter to the editor that recently appeared in the Post and Courier calls attention to the benefits of citizen engagement. Are you frustrated over what is happening in your community? Rather than venting to your neighbors and on social media, the author advises, get involved and gain an understanding of the issues, current efforts to address them, and hurdles to overcome.

With the Preservation Society’s improved website, it is now easier than ever to get engaged and to play an active role in shaping the future of the city and region.

The website is the next step in what began as our Keep Charleston REAL concept. As we believe an engaged citizenry is instrumental to Charleston’s future success, we have transformed the site from the traditional, static look at the organization’s past, to an active, one-stop source for Charleston’s growth-related, planning, preservation, and quality of life issues.

We invite you to interact with all of the positive changes. The advocacy toolkit places at your fingertips:

  • news on relevant issues, updated daily
  • a guide to participating, complete with a public meeting calendar, the latest meeting agendas, and insight into the public comment processes of various public meetings
  • a guide to supporting strong local leadership, which includes information about City Council members and their districts, as well as how to get involved with your neighborhood association.

Help ensure Charleston’s future success, and get engaged!

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2016 Carolopolis Award Recipients

  • 1 Wesson Avenue | The Kuhne-Drews House
    Carolopolis Award
    Owner: English Drews and Stephen Giebner
    Architect: Tim Maguire and Lauren Oller Sanchez
    Contractor: Marc Engelke, Engelke Homes

1 wesson before 1 wesson after

  • 9 Rutledge Avenue
    Carolopolis Award
    Owner: Adam and Jennifer Steen
    Architect: NA
    Contractor: Marc Engelke, Engelke Homes

9 rutledge before 9 rutledge after

  • 23 Legare Street | The Robert Trail Chisolm House
    Pro Merito Award
    Owner: Peter and Diane Horan
    Architect: Glenn Keyes Architects
    Contractor: Richard Marks Restorations

23 legare before 23 legare after

  • 26 Parkwood Avenue
    Carolopolis Award
    Owner: Jason Maxwell, CH2012 LLC
    Architect: Julia F. Martin Architects
    Contractor: Anthony Gentile

26 parkwood before 26 parkwood after

  • 47 East Bay Street | The Anne Boone House
    Carolopolis Award
    Owner: Nathan Berry and Ceara Donnelley
    Architect: Glenn Keyes Architects
    Contractor: Richard Marks Restorations

47 east bay before 47 east bay after

  • 83 Magnolia Avenue
    Carolopolis Award – Compatible New Construction
    Owner: Alexander E. Storch, MD, Barndog Ventures LLC
    Architect: Tyler A. Smyth Architects
    Contractor: Luxury Simplified

83 magnolia

  • 151 Sheppard Street
    Carolopolis Award
    Owner: Julie O’Connor
    Project Designer: Julie O’Connor, American Vernacular
    Contractor: John Frick, Level Building Projects

151 sheppard before 151 sheppard after

  • 258 King Street
    Carolopolis Award
    Owner: Jenel Management Corp.
    Architect: Bill Huey + Associates
    Contractor: Renew Urban

258 king before 258 king after

  • 464 Huger Street
    Carolopolis Award
    Owner: Andrew and Janye Wilkins
    Architects: Tim Maguire and Lindsey Stang
    Contractor: Marc Engelke, Engelke Homes

464 huger before 464 huger after

  • 649 Meeting Street | The Trolley Barn
    Carolopolis Award
    Owner: American College of the Building Arts
    Architect: WGM Design Inc. and Bill Huey + AssociatesContractor: Hitt Contracting Inc.

trolley barn before trolley barn after

  • 1096 Navy Way | The Eternal Father of the Sea Chapel
    Carolopolis Award – Interior
    Owner: City of North Charleston and the Charleston Naval Complex Redevelopment Authority
    Architect: Glenn Keyes Architects
    Contractor: Richard Marks Restorations

eternal father of the sea chapel 2 eternal father of the sea chapel 1

 

  • 135 Meeting Street | The Gibbes Museum of Art
    Carolopolis Award – Interior
    Owner: Carolina Art Association and the City of Charleston
    Architect: Evans and Schmidt Architects
    Contr: NBM Construction Company

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Thomas Mayhem Pinckney

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December 8, 2016 marks the 64th anniversary of the death of Thomas Mayhem Pinckney, a relatively obscure yet integral, early figure in the preservation movement in Charleston. An African American craftsman, Pinckney’s life inspired the Preservation Society to name a special committee after him in 2012. The Thomas Mayhem Pinckney Alliance is dedicated to recognizing and preserving those sites and places in the Charleston area built by, occupied by, and utilized for activities significant to the African American experience.

Pinckney was born in 1877, son of cabinetmaker Nathaniel Pinckney. Educated in Charleston’s public schools and at Clark University Night School, he trained as a stair maker with Luther Alston, another local contractor, before beginning an apprenticeship with Snelson Contracting Co., builders of the Old City Jail and the Convent of Our Lady of Mercy on Legare St. Continue reading

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Preservation Parlance: Preservation, Rehabilitation, Restoration, and Reconstruction

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When Congress passed the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) 50 years ago, it affirmed historic preservation’s importance to the United States’ cultural, environmental, and economic well-being. The passing of the NHPA also formed an official framework for what had previously been a largely informal activity, taken up in grassroots efforts like those seen in Charleston in the 1920s and 1930s. The NHPA charged the Secretary of the Interior (SOI) with establishing professional standards for preserving historic properties and created the Section 106 process, among other programs.

Every profession has its jargon, and from the NHPA comes a complexity of terminology, which can, at times, make historic preservation and its processes inaccessible. With May being Preservation Month, let’s clarify some of the ambiguous aspects of preservation parlance. Continue reading

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