Authentic News

The first step to becoming a better advocate for your community is awareness of the latest events and issues that affect Charleston’s character and quality of life. The Preservation Society aggregates pertinent local, regional, and national news and articles as a resource for the community.

These 10 Charleston artisans are creating goods with a Southern accent
News :: December 11, 2017

"The city is so rich with creative and unique talent, our store now focuses exclusively on local makers and their incredible crafts," said Andy Archie, Director of Retail Operations at the Preservation Society of Charleston. "The Makers program was envisioned as a way to provide a storefront on King Street for the many makers who couldn’t afford to be there on their own."

Handmade for the holidays: Palmetto State offers plenty of gifts for home that go the extra mile
News :: December 2, 2017

It’s been happening in the Charleston area for years, but the movement, which one new shop owner in Greer likened to a “farm-to-table” movement for the home,  seems to be spreading across South Carolina.The renaissance, ranging from the traditional crafts of the Catawba people near Rock Hill and the Gullah of the Lowcountry to high quality furniture and more modern arts and crafts, offers South Carolinians opportunities to make their holiday shopping have more meaning and purpose.

Want to trace the history of homes and land in South Carolina? There's a bounty of resources.
News :: October 28, 2017

In South Carolina, thanks to public records that go back more than 300 years, the potential for researching a building's history, and the lives of those who lived or worked there, is possible, too.

South Carolina Gullah Geechee commission hires new leader
News :: October 8, 2017

The group charged with preserving the culture of the enslaved Africans who worked the coastal rice plantations while also increasing economic opportunities is getting a new leader with multiple talents.

In Charleston, historic preservation versus rising seas: When is it OK to raise a historic home?
News :: October 8, 2017

Asked why he wants to raise his Rutledge Avenue home by 2½ feet, Jack Margolies gestured toward his neighbors.

Charleston History Commission grapples with reconciling Calhoun’s legacy and bigoted beliefs
News :: October 5, 2017

While their conversations may be rooted in the past, Charleston's History Commission is all too aware that their decisions will have a significant effect on the future of the city.

Love Urban Architecture? There Are Maps for That
News :: October 4, 2017

The most visibly arresting buildings are, paradoxically, sometimes the most overlooked in the modern cityscape.

Preservation Society of Charleston's fall home tours are far more than eye candy
News :: September 30, 2017

For the first time since 2014, the Preservation Society of Charleston’s fall house tours will not kick off with a natural disaster, even though last month’s Hurricane Irma came close enough.

Ponds Conservancy to present artifacts from archaeological digs in the Summerville area community
News :: September 25, 2017

The Ponds Conservancy will next month present artifacts found by archaeologists digging in the Summerville area community.

The event is 2-4 p.m. Oct. 15 in the historic Schulz-Lotz farmhouse at 324 Hundred Oaks Parkway.

Emanuel AME Church being tented for termites as it grapples with major repairs
News :: September 20, 2017

As Charleston's Emanuel AME Church prepares to mark its bicentennial next year, church leaders are beginning repairs to make sure their historic building lasts at least 100 years more.

Chartres cleaning dusts off historic preservation issues
News :: September 15, 2017

Which do you prefer? The black or white Madonna of Chartres cathedral in France — neither or both? Your call. Of this much there should be no doubt: Historical preservation is a cause well worth supporting. But which part of that history is best preserved? Just selected slices of it? And if so, which ones would you choose to save, new or old or a mix? Let’s hope we can all agree on one thing: The novel concept of brand new history is an obvious contradiction in terms.

Treatment of Flood-Damaged Older and Historic Buildings
News :: September 12, 2017

In recent years, many older and historic buildings have been affected by the heavy rains and flooding that occurred during hurricanes and tropical storms. The purpose of this booklet is to help building owners minimize structural and cosmetic flood damage.

Saving Society Hill: The birthplace of the Pee Dee looks to its past for new life
News :: September 9, 2017

SOCIETY HILL — As Brian Gandy sifted through the soggy letters in a plastic bin inside the Coker Rogers Store, he realized he was handling pieces of history more than a century old.

His sense of excitement soon turned to a feeling of urgency as he brainstormed about how exactly he could salvage a deteriorating and irreplaceable part of Darlington County's past.

Drayton Hall's new visitor and education center taking shape near iconic plantation house
News :: September 5, 2017

Drayton Hall's new $5 million visitor and education center is steadily taking shape, despite recent heavy rains and mud at the plantation museum site.

It's arguably the most significant construction at Drayton Hall since its surviving plantation home was built in the mid-18th century.

A Controversial Restoration That Wipes Away the Past
News :: September 1, 2017

CHARTRES, France — The pilgrim did not find what he was searching for. As a child, Patrice Bertrand heard his mother recount details of her visit to the shrine of the famous Black Madonna of Chartres Cathedral, 60 miles southwest of Paris. Now Mr. Bertrand, 41, of Nantes, was following in her footsteps. But he was perplexed by what he discovered: “The statue I came to see is not here anymore,” he said. The Black Madonna had become white.

Charleston mayor calls for African-American monument, plaque at Calhoun statue
News :: August 31, 2017

Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg asked the city’s History Commission on Wednesday to consider adding a number of revised historical markers as well as some new monuments across the city in an effort to create a more balanced narrative of Confederate-related history.

Charleston Harbor deepening funds finance 600-acre conservation deal
News :: August 30, 2017

A conservation group has purchased about 600 acres near the east branch of the Cooper River through a preservation program tied to the Charleston Harbor deepening project.

Charleston's History Commission to discuss mayor's call for fuller story of Confederate monuments
News :: August 30, 2017

The city of Charleston's History Commission on Wednesday will take up Mayor John Tecklenburg's call to update the John C. Calhoun monument in Marion Square with more historical context about what the South Carolinian stood for. 

Five historians revisit topic of Confederate monuments
News :: August 26, 2017

After the June 2015 shooting deaths of nine people at Emanuel AME Church, many in the Charleston community embraced opportunities to consider and debate the South’s history of oppression and the myth of the Lost Cause.

North Charleston backs plan to lease historic Chicora Elementary to Metanoia
News :: August 25, 2017

North Charleston City Council on Thursday agreed to give a nonprofit group 18 months to line up investors to renovate the rundown former Chicora Elementary School.

The Rev. Bill Stanfield, CEO of community development organization Metanoia, has said the group needs to have control of the historic building so that it can get a financial plan in place to renovate it. The plan includes raising at least $9 million in donations, grants and other kinds of financing.

Floors, not feet, the new ruling principle for architecture in Charleston
News :: August 24, 2017

Charleston City Council approved last week a sweeping new set of rules meant to stop many of those design trends in their tracks while setting a more creative way forward for the future of Charleston's architecture.

Damaged Kress plaque honoring lunch counter sit-in could be reinstalled before end of year
News :: August 16, 2017

It was a loading truck that knocked the plaque down. After the Preservation Society of Charleston installed in 2013 a King Street historic market to honor the bravery of 24 students from Burke High School who sat down at King Street's Kress lunch counter on April 1, 1960, a delivery truck smacked it down last year, and it's been in limbo ever since.

City of Charleston agrees to spend $41,000 to shore up structural flaws at Read Brothers
News :: August 16, 2017

The city of Charleston has hired NBM Construction to perform emergency repairs on the Read Brothers buildings on upper King St.

City Council voted Tuesday to approve a $41,000 contract for the work. City Councilman Bill Moody said the city's legal staff declared this an emergency situation.

Charleston's Read Brothers forced to close, get repairs due to 'significant threat to life safety'
News :: August 10, 2017

We are sad and concerned to see yet another unfortunate situation as this. Our local businesses and historic buildings have been the catalysts of Charleston's success and we need to protect them.

Separating fact from fiction while touring Charleston
News :: August 7, 2017

We live in a world where there seems to be as much misinformation as there is truth. At times, it is tough to tell what’s what. We hear terms such as fake news and have come to expect spin doctors to put their interpretation on what we just heard and why we should believe it or dismiss it.

It’s only natural, then, that in a tourist-driven, historical city such as ours that certain myths exist surrounding some of what did or didn’t happen here.

American College of the Building Arts offering three fall continuing education classes open to the public
News :: August 7, 2017

This fall, the College of the Building Arts is offering continuing education classes open to the public. Three classes will be offered to start: Intro to Interior Design, Architectural Computer Graphics, and Charleston Architecture: A Historical Perspective. The 14-week classes start Sept. 11, are held 6-9 p.m. one night a week, and are taught by a trained expert in the respective fields. Each course costs $500 and enrollment is limited. Get started by applying online.

International African American Museum launches genealogy center, research initiative
News :: July 18, 2017

While most museums offer visitors the opportunity to learn more about history and culture, Charleston’s International African American Museum hopes to offer something possibly more valuable — the chance to learn more about yourself. 
 

Is culinary success spoiling Charleston?
News :: June 30, 2017

“The people who live here are frustrated and don’t want to see Charleston continue to be number one on these lists,” says Jamee Haley, executive director of Lowcountry Local First. “While some are thriving, we’re losing those businesses that provided vital services to the people who live here.”

Charleston City Council votes to change building height guidelines
News :: June 20, 2017

Charleston City Council voted Tuesday to change downtown's architectural guidelines, including height limits, in one of the most drastic rewrites since the city first took on the task in the 1930s.

Should downtown Charleston property owners be forced to check their building facades for flaws?
News :: May 31, 2017

Downtown Charleston has seen a rash of high profile building problems this year, including the discovery of a facade detaching from a King Street building; damage to a parked car from an office collapse at 11½ St. Philip St.; and bricks from a deteriorating townhouse falling onto Exchange Street.

Don't rush new height rules
News :: May 25, 2017

The Charleston Board of Architectural Review has played an essential role in protecting the historic city. So has a city height ordinance designed to retain the sense of historic scale. But a city plan to revamp its height ordinance on the peninsula risks diminishing the authority of the BAR. Or so say Charleston’s two primary preservation organizations. At this point, the city needs to push the “pause” button.

Height district ordinance would diminish BAR oversight
News :: May 24, 2017

The city’s efforts to amend the height districts on the peninsula and to modify the authority and process of the BAR constitute an unprecedented threat to the review board that has created and protected Charleston’s international appeal and character.

Why are downtown Charleston's buildings falling down? Experts point to three main culprits
News :: May 20, 2017

While each building has its own unique tale of failure, several experts point to three common denominators that they share: shoddy initial construction and renovations, neglect and even a steady hum of vibrations from an ever-growing city.

Building designer saves ramshackle 'gateway' cottage in downtown Charleston
News :: April 30, 2017

This Charleston single cottage is a great example of dying breed of houses from this era,” said Kristopher King, adding that much of the “historic fabric was either salvaged or matched.”

Plans for downtown Charleston hotel on East Bay move upscale
News :: March 12, 2017

The Board of Architectural Review gave the plans for a 47-room lodging just south of the City Market conceptual approval last week, after declining to move the plans forward in November.

Charleston BAR unanimously approves Sergeant Jasper design
News :: February 8, 2017

Charleston's Board of Architectural Review voted unanimously on Wednesday to approve the design of the replacement building on the long-contested Sergeant Jasper site. The preliminary approval means the project at 310 and 322 Broad St. can move forward as scheduled, although the board will require architects to tweak some design details before they bring the plan back for another review.

Old city could become 'miniature Manhattan'
News :: September 16, 2016

The vision of Charleston’s leaders in the 1970s and 1980s could not include the current extraordinary and unanticipated growth, the rise in the metro area’s population from 336,036 in 1970 to 648,090 in 2010, and estimated to be 708,000 in 2020.